Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange
Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange, fruit
Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange
Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange
Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange
Maclura pomifera, Osage Orange
Maclura pomifera (Raf.) C.K. Schneid., Osage Orange
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Osage Orange, Maclura pomifera, is a
deciduous tree found throughout much of the
United States.  They can grow in pure stands
forming dense thorny thickets that were once
used as hedge fences on pastures.
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Osage Orange is named after the Osage
Native American tribe and the large 5 to 6
inch diameter fruit, which is not actually an
orange.
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In the summer, Maclura pomifera grows large
quantities of fruit.  At first they are bright
yellow green, but after falling off the trees in
fall and early winter, they turn more orange.
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Another common name of Maclura pomifera
is Bois d'Arc, given by the French (meaning
wood of the bow) after seeing the Osage
Indians use the wood in crafting their bows. It
is pronouced bo-dark.
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Maclura pomifera has thorns on the
twigs and branches, making it suitable
for use as hedge fences previous to the
invention of barbed wire.
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The bark of Osage Orange is broken
into long vertical fissures where the
orange-red inner bark shows through. 
On younger branches, the bark is
actually brown and green.
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Eastern native trees